Mowgliz Production
P.O. Box 110
CH-8046 Zurich

Living with Tides and Tigers - The Sundarbans Mangrove Forest

by Gertrud and Helmut Denzau, Elisabeth Fahrni Mansur and Rubaiyat Mansur Mowgli

The Sundarbans, shared by Bangladesh and India in the Ganges delta, is the world's largest contiguous mangrove forest. Life in this ever-changing wilderness is ruled by tides and tigers.

This stunning collection of photographs documents the wildlife, various ecological aspects and the people of this unique jungle. Interspersed with personal accounts about the authors' experiences over the past nearly twenty years in the forest and insightful back-ground information, this attractive coffee-table book aims to increase awareness about this fragile ecosystem.

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Sundarban - a basic field guide

Did you know that some fish can climb trees? How do dolphins find fish in muddy waters? Why do tigers have territories?

Although an increasingly popular destination for both local and international tourists, information on Sundarban is not widely available. Yet this fragile eco-system is threatened by the demands of a growing human population, reduction of water inflow, pollution, over-fishing and unsustainable exploitation.

Elisabeth and Rubaiyat Fahrni Mansur have been working in Sundarban as nature guides, wildlife photographers and independent researchers for many years. Together with young artists and conservationists they have created this practical field guide. Combining simple language and attractive illustrations, they explain the importance and complexity of this fragile mangrove ecosystem.

With this field guide they hope to encourage you to discover and experience this amazing mangrove habitat, and contribute to a better understanding and the conservation of our natural heritage

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The Mowalis of the Sundarban (out of print)

Elisabeth Fahrni Mansur and Rubaiyat Mansur Mowgli

The Sundarban of Bangladesh is a maze of rivers, creeks and islands at the mouth of the Ganges Delta. 

Every year the honey collectors, locally known as mowalis, penetrate deep in to this dense and inhospitable tidal forest, braving stinging bees and occasional tiger attacks to collect precious honey and wax. This is their story. 

Rubaiyat and Elisabeth Fahrni Mansur have followed the mowalis through the Sundarban since 1995, documenting their lives and gaining insight of this unique and dying tradition. The two passionate photographers spend most of their time in these mangroves of Bangladesh, working with tourists, wildlife enthusiasts and film crews.

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